Wine Jobs in Philadelphia

Sommelier, Winemaker, and Other Wine-Related Positions

 

Wine Job Listings for Philly Metro

Looking for a job in the wine trade? You are in the right place.  Whether you are a winemaker, sommelier, or bartender:  you can find the perfect job right here!  We bring in our daily feed for all restaurant and wine trade positions from a dozen sources.  Find all available wine jobs in Philadelphia today! Educate yourself! Prior to applying  for a job in the wine trade, you should consider professional  wine certification. For a full list of suggested programs, including sommelier certification, we strongly suggest you check out the  SOMM website.  It shows the breakdown of all major wine certification programs, and how they relate to each other (full disclosure: the Wine School of Philadelphia is a NWS member).

 

Wine School Ambassador Program

 We are currently offering positions in our Ambassador program.  Current pay can be north of $60K for part time work. Application and information are here: https://www.vinology.com/wine-ambassador-application/

 

 Featured Job Opportunities

  • Winery/Facility Maintenance Technician
  • Harvest Cellar Worker
  • Retail Wine Buyer
  • East Coast Sales Manager
  • Harvest Cellar Worker
  • Hospitality Specialist
  • Accounts Payable Associate
  • Harvest – Lab Technician
  • Italian Wine Buyer
  • Wine Director
  • Winemaker
  • Staff Accountant
  • Sr. QC Technician
  • Winery Representative
  • General Winery Technician
  • Senior Portfolio Director
  • Sommelier

 

Be Notified First of Upcoming Wine Jobs

We’ve seen hundreds of job postings and thousands of applicants in the Philadelphia Metro region.  To insure that qualified applicants get the first crack at the best paying jobs, we now issue all job postings via our Wine Jobs Newsletter.

Apply for a Wine Job

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Wine School of Philadelphia https://www.vinology.com Sommeliers, Winemakers and Wine Lovers Thu, 09 Apr 2020 22:09:40 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://www.vinology.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/cropped-Wine-School-ID-32x32.png Wine School of Philadelphia https://www.vinology.com 32 32 Buying Wine Online https://www.vinology.com/buying-wine-online/ https://www.vinology.com/buying-wine-online/#comments Sun, 05 Apr 2020 20:07:43 +0000 https://www.vinology.com/?p=626257 I didn’t have to do much research for this article. I buy around $80K worth of wine a year, for the wine school, not me.  I know who really delivers, […]

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buy wine online

A Guide to Buying Wine Online

I didn’t have to do much research for this article. I buy around $80K worth of wine a year, for the wine school, not me.  I know who really delivers, in the most literal sense.

I did my due diligence, though. I spent a few hours reading the  “Best Online Wine Shops”  lists that were already published.  A lot of lists had Wine.com as their top pick. That online wine shop is decent, but they also run a referral program  (you can get paid for promoting them) I took those recommendations with a grain of salt, and I suggest you do, too..

Many articles also recommended shops like K&L. They are a great wine store, but they don’t offer delivery to many places, especially not Philadelphia where I live. That leads me to believe that a lot of these articles were written by Californians for Californians. Some lists smacked of self-congratulatory elitism. Bon Appetit has a list that only featured wine shops that offer natural or orange wines. That’s awesome, but most of those wines are super-expensive, don’t ship nationally, and taste like vinegar.

 

Top Sites to Buy Wine Online

So here’s my list of wine shops that well great wine and also will ship to most addresses in the US.

Astor Wine & Spirits

Website: https://www.astorwines.com/
Address: 399 Lafayette St, New York, NY 10003

Why this wine shop is awesome:  If you are looking for the interesting and rare, this is the spot to shop.  It’s very well curated and their “Staff Picks” are worthwhile, which is so remarkable rare that it took me years to realize these recommendations were legit. Often, there are wines here that just don’t exist anywhere else in America, which makes sense: they are the wine shop in Manhattan. Want an awesome single-vineyard red wine from Mexico with an illustration of a Lucha libre’s buttocks on the back label? They got you covered. Want a few wines from the Canary Islands or maybe some rare Georgian wines? Maybe you just want wine from some of the best small wineries in Sonoma? They got you.

Pro tip: you often can get a 10% discount and free shipping for orders over $100 if you search hard enough.

Wine Library

Website: https://winelibrary.com/
Address: 586 Morris Ave, Springfield Township, NJ 07081

Why this wine shop is awesome: This wine shop that launched Gary Vaynerchuk into internet stardom.  They’ve had ups and downs since that time, but over the past two years they have earn their right to be on this list. They offer really great pricing on wine, most often the best available anywhere, which has been their calling card for a decade now. They recently expanded their shipping to almost all states, so getting wine isn’t a problem.  They specialize in fine wines from well-known regions, so if Barolo or Margaux are your jamb, then you should be buying from WL.  Their search features are particularly good, especially if you are looking for wines in a certain price category or point rating. Want a 92 point Grenache for $15? That will be easy to find.

Protip: If you buy a lot of wine online, you should sign up for their Library Pass program. It offers free shipping on most wines for a yearly subscription of $100. This allows for buying a few bottles at time.

 

Wines Till Sold Out

Website: https://www.wtso.com/
Address: 1001 Route 73 South, Pennsauken, NJ 08110.

Why this wine shop is awesome:  Born from a local Jersey wine shop named Roger Wilco, this online retailer grew to become one of the biggest online wine shops in the country. Their business model –sell a small selection of wines a deep discounts– was not an original idea (the concept was the foundation of the Chairman’s Selection program across the river in Pennvyanvia) but they perfected it. Every day there is one featured wine for sale on the front page, and a few other “Last Chance” bottles on a back page.  Along with the substantial discounts, they offer free shipping with a minimum purchase of four bottles.

Protip: The discounts are real. but caveat emptor applies. Most of the wines they offer are insanely good, but there are always some dirt in a goldmine.  Do a quick bit of online research before making any sizable purchase.

Drizly

Website: https://drizly.com/home
Address: 334 Boylston St Boston, MA

Why this wine shop is awesome: Who doesn’t love the idea of getting booze delivered to your doorstep? Apparently the geeks in Boston loved their booze so much that by 2016 they had two competing local services –Drizly and Buttery– when the rest of the country had none. Even L.A. had to wait another year before they could get their Grey Goose delivered. Those two Beantown booze barons eventually merged into Drizly. While there are many other vendors in this space now, only Drizly can claim national reach.

Protip: This company offers amazing convenience, but there is a cost. What’s on offer here are national brands: you won’t find exotically beautiful wines or discount pricing. If you need your booze and you need it now–I’m not one to judge– then this is your spot.

 

 

 

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]]> https://www.vinology.com/buying-wine-online/feed/ 2 Seven Beer Styles https://www.vinology.com/seven-beer-styles/ https://www.vinology.com/seven-beer-styles/#respond Mon, 30 Mar 2020 14:00:11 +0000 https://www.vinology.com/?p=606564 Did you know there are over 6,000 craft breweries in the United States alone? And the phenomenon is global. People want good beer; artisanal, hand-crafted beers made with love and […]

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Did you know there are over 6,000 craft breweries in the United States alone? And the phenomenon is global. People want good beer; artisanal, hand-crafted beers made with love and not by an automated factory that pushes millions of insipid beers to the market every day; people want flavor.

With this in mind, we wanted to tell you about the most popular beer styles today. Beers that represent the whole spectrum of flavor and texture, alcoholic strength, and color; beers that you have to try to understand the complexities of craft beer.

Let’s start by saying that the best-selling beer style in the world is the American Lager (closely followed by light versions.)

You know them well: Budweiser, Miller High Life, and Coors are prominent examples, but they’re not on our list today because, as people learn more about the technical nuances and beauty of craft beers, at least we hope, the popular beer style will fall out of favor.

Upcoming Beer Classes

A  great way to learn about beer and brewing is to attend a  class at the Philly Beer School!

Craft Beer and Cheese Pairing

Friday, April 24 from 7:30 pm to 9:30 pm
0 Seat(s) Available

Beer Brewing Program, Level One (Spring Semester)

Saturday, May 9 from 1:00 pm
0 Seat(s) Available

Great Ciders of the World

Thursday, June 11 from 7:30 pm to 9:30 pm
5 Seat(s) Available

Beer School: The Hops Class

Thursday, June 18 from 7:30 pm to 9:30 pm
0 Seat(s) Available

Craft Beer and Cheese Pairing

Friday, July 10 from 7:30 pm to 9:30 pm
20 Seat(s) Available

Beer Brewing Program, Level One (Fall Semester)

Saturday, September 12 from 12:00 pm to 5:00 pm
14 Seat(s) Available

Beer Brewing Program, Level One (Winter Semester)

Saturday, December 12 from 12:00 pm to 5:00 pm
6 Seat(s) Available

Beer Brewing Program, Level Two (Winter Semester)

Sat, February 6, 2021 from 12:00 pm to 5:00 pm
7 Seat(s) Available

 

IPA

This style got its name from India Pale Ale. Legend has it; this style was an extra-strong beer made to withstand long journeys through the sea from England to India. Today IPA is just IPA and stands for nothing, but its aromatic personality.

IPAs are top-fermented beers (fermented with aromatic-enhancing Ale yeasts) that stand out for the high amounts of American, or New World hops added to the beer.

Hops make IPAs incredibly aromatic. Pine nut aromas and tropical fruit scents like guava and citrus jump from the glass. The otherwise clear beer has a bitter profile thanks to the hops.

IPA

A Favorite IPA at the Philly Beer School

Pale Ale

A classic beer style with a natural balance between hop and malt aromas. Also, top-fermented, pale ales are more approachable than IPAs; this is the type of beer that you can enjoy all day.

With an average, toned-down alcohol strength, a clean profile, and an easy-to-drink personality, this is the craft brewers’ answer to the industrial lagers. Often golden, pale ales have a rich palate and are creamy compared to lagers.

American Stout

This dark beer is having a moment. It gets its color from the roasted malt used for the style; the dark malt also brings forward aromas of roasted coffee and dark chocolate. The beers are easily recognizable for their black color and large, tan, foamy head.

As with most other dark beers, it’s the malt and not the hops that predominate both on the nose and palate. Strength wise, you’ll find them in the range between 5% VOL and 7% VOL.

Porter

Dark malts predominate in this style too, so expect similarities in color and aromas with Stouts. Although similar, they have very different backgrounds, as Porters were invented in England centuries ago to quench the thirst of port workers who needed an energy boost.

Today, technically, the only difference between Porters and Stouts is the type of barley used. Stouts are made from unmalted grains, while Porters are based on malted barley, a small, but significant difference. For beer drinkers, the preference usually goes to one or the other.

IPA Brewing Supplies

Home Brewing Supplies

Wild & Sour Ales

These are the trendiest beers around, although it’s one of the older beer styles in existence! Producers don’t ferment these beers with selected, store-bought yeast, but with wild, ambient yeast found naturally in their cellars, and the results are always unpredictable and exciting!

The spontaneous fermentation adds to the beer a set of funky but pleasant flavors and a most welcomed acidity that makes this beer perfect for food pairings.

Amongst this category, you could consider the Belgian Gose, a cloudy, fruity, and tart beer to which producers add a pinch of salt and coriander seeds to make an epic, historical beer.

Pilsner

Along with the pale ale, this is the beer style you should get if you’re getting started in the realm of craft beer.

Pilsner beers where the first clear, bottom-fermenting (lager) beer is the world, developed in the Czech Republic in 1842. The golden-hued, bright, refreshing beer contrasted greatly with the dark, murky beers of the time and soon became the world’s standard.

Fresh, easy to sip, with subtle malt aromas and a light but creamy palate, Pilsners are ideal for summer days.

Brewing at the Philly Beer School!

Brewing at the Philly Beer School!

Wheat Beer

To round up the list, we have the famous wheat beer. This style is accomplished by using wheat instead of, or in addition to barley malt. Wheat beers are rich, creamy, full-bodied ales that are both satisfying and addictive.

Originally from Germany and Belgium, today craft brewers around the globe make pristine examples. A characteristic banana note is common and adding citrus peels to the mixture is also a standard practice — this one you’ll love. Filtered or milky-white, wheat beers are not only popular today, they have been beloved for centuries.

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Economic Assistance Guide for the Wine Trade during the COVID-19 Pandemic https://www.vinology.com/winery-assistance/ https://www.vinology.com/winery-assistance/#respond Thu, 26 Mar 2020 22:12:26 +0000 https://www.vinology.com/?p=625946   HR 748/the “CARES” Act is the two trillion dollar stimulus bill that is now law. It has several key features that any business owner in the wine trade should […]

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Winery Assistance

HR 748/the “CARES” Act is the two trillion dollar stimulus bill that is now law. It has several key features that any business owner in the wine trade should be aware of. Most of the key points are in a subsection called “Keeping American Workers Paid and Employed Act” which was authored by a team of four bipartisan Senators: Marco Rubia (R), Ben Cardin (D), Susan Collins (R) and Jeanne Shaheen (D).

This program is supposed to be fully online by Friday, April 3rd.

While other parts of the stimulus package focused on getting money to US citizens, the KAWPEA is written to protect small businesses. There are a lot of options for someone running a business with less than 50 people, which is pretty much the entire wine trade. In this article, I am listing all the important elements of the bill, and explaining how they could help your business. I will keep this page updated as this bill becomes laws. I hope to have links to applications and information as soon as they become available. Feel free to add relevant information in the comments below.

FYI, this information is valid for any small business, including wine shops and restaurants.

Paycheck Protection Program

Payrolls aren’t as big for wineries as they are for other small businesses, but it’s far from trivial. This program offers loans of 2.5 times your average monthly payroll. The loans have low-interest rates, with a maximum of 4%, and are expected to have a 24-hour turn-around once the program has been established.  The key detail here is that the loan will be forgiven if you maintain the same payroll levels. In effect, this loan would become a grant. You would only have to pay back the interest accrued.

Small businesses are going to benefit greatly from this section. Businesses will be eligible to obtain a loan equal to two and a half times their average monthly payroll for a full year. The program includes a debt forgiveness component (up to 100%) when loan proceeds are used for payroll and other eligible expenses during the eight weeks after obtaining the loan. Those expenses include payroll, rent, mortgage interest, or utilities

Debt is the biggest burden for many in the wine trade. Land and equipment costs often mean you have a multi-million-dollar debt. This section is going to be a Godsend to many small wineries.  This is link to the SBA program page: https://www.sba.gov/funding-programs/loans/paycheck-protection-program

Small Business Debt Relief

Many wineries (as well as breweries and distilleries) have loans from the Small Business Administration (SBA).  Often these SBA loans were taken out to purchase buildings or equipment. This includes the following SBA programs: 504 loans, 7(a) Community Advantage, and Microloan. This bill requires the SBA to forgive your loan for half a year. This means the SBA will pay the principal, the interest, and all fees for half a year. This section has been funded with $17 Billion dollars.

504 Loans

For existing borrowers with SBA 504 loans, SBA has issued guidelines on loan deferments.  If your winery has one of these loans, you should contact your banker.  These payments are supposed to be automatic.

7(a) Loans

The SBA will also pay the principal and interest of new 7(a) loans issued prior to September 27, 2020 for six months.  Applications can be made via a SBA-qualified bank.

Emergency EIDL Grants

This expands the existing Emergency EIDL Grant program that the SBA already runs. This allows for a $10,000 advanced within three days to cover payroll and to service debt obligations. This section has been funded with $17 Billion dollars. This is the link directly to the COVID-19 page: https://disasterloan.sba.gov/apply-for-disaster-loan/index.html  This is a great program if you need money quickly. However, the next section may be a better fit if you can hold out a little longer.

How the Wine School is Helping

If you are a member of the food or wine trade and lost your job, you can become a Wine School Ambassador. We are paying up to 45% of our revenue to people in need. Here is the link to apply: https://www.vinology.com/wine-ambassador-application/

How Much Assistance Could A Winery Recieve?

These are back-of-an-envelope calculations, so YMMV. On average, a medium-sized winery has a payroll burden of $32K and has a debt burden of around $50K. Those are monthly amounts, not annual. That would put the Federal assistance in the ballpark of $380,000 for a medium-sized winery.

SBA Background

The Wine School worked with the SBA to expand it’s footprint several years ago. It was one of the smartest choices I made as a business owner.  In fact,  it went so well that a few of our bankers are now students at the school!  They wrote us up a few years ago: https://www.sba.gov/node/1623864

Wine Industry Lobbyists

In addition to CARES, the lobbyist groups WineAmerica and the Wine Institute have been pushing for several other remediations on Capitol Hill. This includes suspending federal excise taxes through December 31st, making the Craft Beverage Modernization and Tax Reform Act permanent, and suspending tariffs on alcohol beverages and related suppliers. Let’s hope they can push the ball forward on these topics.

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The Story of Champagne https://www.vinology.com/the-story-of-champagne/ https://www.vinology.com/the-story-of-champagne/#respond Mon, 16 Mar 2020 14:05:35 +0000 https://www.vinology.com/?p=606570 Champagne is one of those wines that every person, in every part of the world has heard about. It is the French sparkling wine that has the world in awe. […]

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champagne

A brief overview of Champagne!

Champagne is one of those wines that every person, in every part of the world has heard about. It is the French sparkling wine that has the world in awe. Isn’t it funny though, that this sparkling wine was technically founded by the British and not by the French?

A Brief History of Champers

The first vines of Champagne were initially planted by the Romans in 57BC. For a long time, wines from the region were seen as lesser quality than the rest of France. The quality, however, got progressively better over the following century as Champagne was constantly trying to upstage Burgundy and surpass their quality. This rivalry between the regions intensified to a point where civil war seemed inevitable.
The great feud, however, finally came to an end with the discovery of sparkling wine and the region’s dedication to producing this new, innovative style of wine.

Popular to contrary belief, the discovery of sparkling wines was not intentional.  Sparkling wine was created after a shipment of wine from Champagne reached England and it had refermented inside the barrel. Since the Carbon Dioxide had nowhere to go, it was trapped inside and thus, sparkling wine was born.

Although there were very mixed feelings at first about this sparkling wine, the consumers who enjoyed the bubbles bought copious amounts of the wine and thus, pushing Champagne into producing more of this style.
With time and a lot of refinement over the years, wine producers were able to better quality wine and packaging solutions for these complex wines.

champagne tasting

A Champagne Wine Tasting Class

All Champagne is Bubbly (But Not All Bubbles Are)

The first thing to note about authentic Champagne wine is that it has to come from the region of Champagne in France. The rules regarding the production of Champagne are extremely strict and specific – but it’s what you expect from one of the world’s most prestigious wine producers.

Many places in the world, and even regions in France, create sparkling wines in exactly the same way. Those wine’s can’t be called Champagne.

During production, only the traditional sparkling method is allowed to be used. This method is considered the best method for high-quality wines. The method means that the second fermentation of the wine occurs inside the bottle, trapping all the natural Carbon dioxide bubbles in the wine. Most people (including many sommeliers)  think Chardonnay, Pinot Noir, and Pinot Meunier are the only grapes allowed. That is incorrect. The obscure varietals Arbane, Petit Meslier are allowed, as are Pinot Blanc and Pinot Gris.

This production method is also extremely labor-intensive as each bottle of wine has to go through a process of riddling, disgorgement and topping up. These processes including turning each bottle upside down over a period of days or weeks to allow the dead yeast cells to settle in the neck of the bottle. Thereafter, the bottle-neck is frozen and these yeast cells are shot out, and the wine is topped up with more wine and a bit of sugar.

Champagne and Cheese Pairing

A Champagne and Cheese Pairing

Different styles of champagne

Champagne comes in a few different styles that allow some diversity.

  • Blanc de Blanc (white from white) refers to white grapes used for this white wine. In this case, it can only be Chardonnay.
  • Blanc de Noir (black from white) means that they have used red grapes to produce these whites. In Champagne, this can be either Pinot Noir or Pinot Meunier but is often a blend of the two. It’s important to note that only the skin of a grape is red – so white wines can be produced just by preventing the juice to come into contact with the skins.
  • Rosés are the product of blending these whites and reds together before the wine is bottled.

The accidental production of Champagne was probably one of the greatest things to could happen to the world’s wine industry. With great complexity and uniqueness, Champagne will forever be the drink of celebration. If you want more, check out our wine tasting class on the subject: https://www.vinology.com/class/champagne/

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]]> https://www.vinology.com/the-story-of-champagne/feed/ 0 Wine School and COVID-19 https://www.vinology.com/wine-school-and-covid-19/ Thu, 12 Mar 2020 14:30:18 +0000 https://www.vinology.com/?p=617170 The post Wine School and COVID-19 appeared first on Wine School of Philadelphia.

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Reschedule Codes and Options

Section updated 4/9/2020

As the pandemic continues, we are canceling classes and issuing reschedule codes with at least a week’s notice. This will continue until we are notified that schools can reopen. Please be patient: it may take several weeks to receive a reschedule code due to the backlog of customer support. 

This is specifically for one-day classes. We have offered all Core program students options to reschedule. We are now working on options for the two Advanced courses  that were interrupted by this pandemic.

 

Spport the Wine School!

Section added 3/25/2020

If you are looking to help out in this difficult time, here’s where to find information. We also have included a way for our out-of-work students to earn some additional income. https://www.vinology.com/support-the-wine-school-during-the-covid-19-pandemic/

Philadelphia and ALL Schools have Closed (this includes us)

Section added 3/16/2020

Philadelphia ordered all nonessential businesses to shut down by 5 p.m. on Monday (3/16) and will halt all nonessential government operations on Tuesday, in the city’s most aggressive steps yet to slow the spread of the coronavirus.

Restaurants will have to be take-out only. Most retail stores will shutter through at least March 27. City government offices will be closed to the public, and only essential government employees will report to work. Only businesses classified as “essential” by the city, like supermarkets, gas stations, banks, post offices, daycares, and veterinary clinics will be allowed to remain open, officials said.

Cancelled Classes Information

Section added 3/17/2020

If you are attending a single-session class in March, your class has been cancelled. The purchaser of the tickets was sent an email with all details. This is the blueprint of the email  that was sent:

John Doe,

I hope you are safe and staying healthy. It’s with a heavy heart that we can’t host classes right now. We will reopen as soon as the Governor allows us to, and the pandemic is over.

You have tickets to [name of class] on [date] which has to be postponed. You will be receiving a gift code for the full amount of your purchase. If you purchased these seats for someone else, please let them know the class has been canceled.

We ask only one favor of you: If you have any questions, please wait until after the pandemic is over. By that point, we should have some breathing room.

Postponed Courses Information

Section added 3/16/2020

If you are attending a multi-day course at the school, you were emailed the following:

I hope you are remaining safe and healthy. Its a difficult time for everyone.

Classes will resume once the Governor has given us permission to do so and the pandemic has ended.

Please be assured that, we are doing our best to accommodate you and all your students. We want to make sure that your experience at the Wine School is a fruitful one. We are currently building out contingency plans and will relay them to you as soon as possible. This is not an overnight process and will take weeks.

We ask only one favor of you: If you have any questions, please wait until after the pandemic is over. By that point, we should have some breathing room to answer questions.

 

 

Disinfection Protocols

Our classroom and facilities are disinfected daily using hospital-grade products and have hand sanitizer stations at the entrance. We also have four HEPA air filtration systems scrubbing the air during class.

The classroom is specifically designed in a way to ensure face-to-face distancing. The classroom size is fewer than 25.

These are standard protocols we have in place every winter. We’ve always been very cognizant of these issues and had these protocols in place long before the covid-19 pandemic. We do this every year to prevent any flu virus to !*#&#  with our classes (and your health).

If You (or anyone you know) Have Been Exposed to COVID-19

We take the well being of all our students very seriously. We currently have zero known students who have the virus and attended classes. We track everyone who has attended classes at the school. If you or anyone you know has been exposed to the COVID-19 virus and have attended classes at the Wine School, it is your ethical duty to report this information to us. Please do so on this form.

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Hand Sanitizer Station at Entrance

Hand Sanitizer Station at Entrance

Hospital Grade Disinfectant Used on All Surfaces on a Daily Basis

Hospital Grade Disinfectant Used on All Surfaces on a Daily Basis

70% Alcohol Wipes in Bathroom

70% Alcohol Wipes in Bathroom. Used for Removing Perfume AND for sanitization.

70% Alcohol Wipes in Bathroom. Used for Removing Perfume AND for sanitization.

70% Alcohol Wipes in Bathroom. Used for Removing Cologne AND for sanitization.

Purell Sanitizer Outside Bathrooms

Purell Sanitizer Outside Bathrooms

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]]> March 2020 Newsletter https://www.vinology.com/march-2020-newsletter/ https://www.vinology.com/march-2020-newsletter/#respond Wed, 04 Mar 2020 21:43:10 +0000 https://www.vinology.com/?p=616323 ‌ March 2020 Newsletter ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ FLASH SALE!!! 50% Off  ALL Spring Classes! ‌ Our Spring semester has been sold out for months. Wanna guess what we […]

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The Wine School Newsletter

Register today for our monthly newsletter. Wine reviews, features, and upcoming classes.  Subscribers recieve our wine reviews, sales, and articles weeks before everyone else. 

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]]> https://www.vinology.com/march-2020-newsletter/feed/ 0 February Wine Newsletter https://www.vinology.com/february-wine-newsletter/ https://www.vinology.com/february-wine-newsletter/#respond Mon, 24 Feb 2020 22:15:41 +0000 https://www.vinology.com/?p=615231 ‌ Wine School Newsletter for February ‌ ‌ Wine School Newsletter for February Talk about 1st world problems: with the potential tariffs looming, we pulled in a crazy amount of […]

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Holiday Wine Guide https://www.vinology.com/holiday-wine-guide-2019/ https://www.vinology.com/holiday-wine-guide-2019/#respond Mon, 16 Dec 2019 02:30:56 +0000 https://www.vinology.com/?p=601633 ‌ Happy Holidays! We have a jam-packed newsletter for you this December. It’s everything you need to survive the holidays. The only thing better would be a barrel of whiskey […]

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Wine School of Philadelphia https://www.vinology.com Sommeliers, Winemakers and Wine Lovers Thu, 09 Apr 2020 22:09:40 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://www.vinology.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/cropped-Wine-School-ID-32x32.png Wine School of Philadelphia https://www.vinology.com 32 32 Buying Wine Online https://www.vinology.com/buying-wine-online/ https://www.vinology.com/buying-wine-online/#comments Sun, 05 Apr 2020 20:07:43 +0000 https://www.vinology.com/?p=626257 I didn’t have to do much research for this article. I buy around $80K worth of wine a year, for the wine school, not me.  I know who really delivers, […]

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buy wine online

A Guide to Buying Wine Online

I didn’t have to do much research for this article. I buy around $80K worth of wine a year, for the wine school, not me.  I know who really delivers, in the most literal sense.

I did my due diligence, though. I spent a few hours reading the  “Best Online Wine Shops”  lists that were already published.  A lot of lists had Wine.com as their top pick. That online wine shop is decent, but they also run a referral program  (you can get paid for promoting them) I took those recommendations with a grain of salt, and I suggest you do, too..

Many articles also recommended shops like K&L. They are a great wine store, but they don’t offer delivery to many places, especially not Philadelphia where I live. That leads me to believe that a lot of these articles were written by Californians for Californians. Some lists smacked of self-congratulatory elitism. Bon Appetit has a list that only featured wine shops that offer natural or orange wines. That’s awesome, but most of those wines are super-expensive, don’t ship nationally, and taste like vinegar.

 

Top Sites to Buy Wine Online

So here’s my list of wine shops that well great wine and also will ship to most addresses in the US.

Astor Wine & Spirits

Website: https://www.astorwines.com/
Address: 399 Lafayette St, New York, NY 10003

Why this wine shop is awesome:  If you are looking for the interesting and rare, this is the spot to shop.  It’s very well curated and their “Staff Picks” are worthwhile, which is so remarkable rare that it took me years to realize these recommendations were legit. Often, there are wines here that just don’t exist anywhere else in America, which makes sense: they are the wine shop in Manhattan. Want an awesome single-vineyard red wine from Mexico with an illustration of a Lucha libre’s buttocks on the back label? They got you covered. Want a few wines from the Canary Islands or maybe some rare Georgian wines? Maybe you just want wine from some of the best small wineries in Sonoma? They got you.

Pro tip: you often can get a 10% discount and free shipping for orders over $100 if you search hard enough.

Wine Library

Website: https://winelibrary.com/
Address: 586 Morris Ave, Springfield Township, NJ 07081

Why this wine shop is awesome: This wine shop that launched Gary Vaynerchuk into internet stardom.  They’ve had ups and downs since that time, but over the past two years they have earn their right to be on this list. They offer really great pricing on wine, most often the best available anywhere, which has been their calling card for a decade now. They recently expanded their shipping to almost all states, so getting wine isn’t a problem.  They specialize in fine wines from well-known regions, so if Barolo or Margaux are your jamb, then you should be buying from WL.  Their search features are particularly good, especially if you are looking for wines in a certain price category or point rating. Want a 92 point Grenache for $15? That will be easy to find.

Protip: If you buy a lot of wine online, you should sign up for their Library Pass program. It offers free shipping on most wines for a yearly subscription of $100. This allows for buying a few bottles at time.

 

Wines Till Sold Out

Website: https://www.wtso.com/
Address: 1001 Route 73 South, Pennsauken, NJ 08110.

Why this wine shop is awesome:  Born from a local Jersey wine shop named Roger Wilco, this online retailer grew to become one of the biggest online wine shops in the country. Their business model –sell a small selection of wines a deep discounts– was not an original idea (the concept was the foundation of the Chairman’s Selection program across the river in Pennvyanvia) but they perfected it. Every day there is one featured wine for sale on the front page, and a few other “Last Chance” bottles on a back page.  Along with the substantial discounts, they offer free shipping with a minimum purchase of four bottles.

Protip: The discounts are real. but caveat emptor applies. Most of the wines they offer are insanely good, but there are always some dirt in a goldmine.  Do a quick bit of online research before making any sizable purchase.

Drizly

Website: https://drizly.com/home
Address: 334 Boylston St Boston, MA

Why this wine shop is awesome: Who doesn’t love the idea of getting booze delivered to your doorstep? Apparently the geeks in Boston loved their booze so much that by 2016 they had two competing local services –Drizly and Buttery– when the rest of the country had none. Even L.A. had to wait another year before they could get their Grey Goose delivered. Those two Beantown booze barons eventually merged into Drizly. While there are many other vendors in this space now, only Drizly can claim national reach.

Protip: This company offers amazing convenience, but there is a cost. What’s on offer here are national brands: you won’t find exotically beautiful wines or discount pricing. If you need your booze and you need it now–I’m not one to judge– then this is your spot.

 

 

 

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]]> https://www.vinology.com/buying-wine-online/feed/ 2 Seven Beer Styles https://www.vinology.com/seven-beer-styles/ https://www.vinology.com/seven-beer-styles/#respond Mon, 30 Mar 2020 14:00:11 +0000 https://www.vinology.com/?p=606564 Did you know there are over 6,000 craft breweries in the United States alone? And the phenomenon is global. People want good beer; artisanal, hand-crafted beers made with love and […]

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Did you know there are over 6,000 craft breweries in the United States alone? And the phenomenon is global. People want good beer; artisanal, hand-crafted beers made with love and not by an automated factory that pushes millions of insipid beers to the market every day; people want flavor.

With this in mind, we wanted to tell you about the most popular beer styles today. Beers that represent the whole spectrum of flavor and texture, alcoholic strength, and color; beers that you have to try to understand the complexities of craft beer.

Let’s start by saying that the best-selling beer style in the world is the American Lager (closely followed by light versions.)

You know them well: Budweiser, Miller High Life, and Coors are prominent examples, but they’re not on our list today because, as people learn more about the technical nuances and beauty of craft beers, at least we hope, the popular beer style will fall out of favor.

Upcoming Beer Classes

A  great way to learn about beer and brewing is to attend a  class at the Philly Beer School!

Craft Beer and Cheese Pairing

Friday, April 24 from 7:30 pm to 9:30 pm
0 Seat(s) Available

Beer Brewing Program, Level One (Spring Semester)

Saturday, May 9 from 1:00 pm
0 Seat(s) Available

Great Ciders of the World

Thursday, June 11 from 7:30 pm to 9:30 pm
5 Seat(s) Available

Beer School: The Hops Class

Thursday, June 18 from 7:30 pm to 9:30 pm
0 Seat(s) Available

Craft Beer and Cheese Pairing

Friday, July 10 from 7:30 pm to 9:30 pm
20 Seat(s) Available

Beer Brewing Program, Level One (Fall Semester)

Saturday, September 12 from 12:00 pm to 5:00 pm
14 Seat(s) Available

Beer Brewing Program, Level One (Winter Semester)

Saturday, December 12 from 12:00 pm to 5:00 pm
6 Seat(s) Available

Beer Brewing Program, Level Two (Winter Semester)

Sat, February 6, 2021 from 12:00 pm to 5:00 pm
7 Seat(s) Available

 

IPA

This style got its name from India Pale Ale. Legend has it; this style was an extra-strong beer made to withstand long journeys through the sea from England to India. Today IPA is just IPA and stands for nothing, but its aromatic personality.

IPAs are top-fermented beers (fermented with aromatic-enhancing Ale yeasts) that stand out for the high amounts of American, or New World hops added to the beer.

Hops make IPAs incredibly aromatic. Pine nut aromas and tropical fruit scents like guava and citrus jump from the glass. The otherwise clear beer has a bitter profile thanks to the hops.

IPA

A Favorite IPA at the Philly Beer School

Pale Ale

A classic beer style with a natural balance between hop and malt aromas. Also, top-fermented, pale ales are more approachable than IPAs; this is the type of beer that you can enjoy all day.

With an average, toned-down alcohol strength, a clean profile, and an easy-to-drink personality, this is the craft brewers’ answer to the industrial lagers. Often golden, pale ales have a rich palate and are creamy compared to lagers.

American Stout

This dark beer is having a moment. It gets its color from the roasted malt used for the style; the dark malt also brings forward aromas of roasted coffee and dark chocolate. The beers are easily recognizable for their black color and large, tan, foamy head.

As with most other dark beers, it’s the malt and not the hops that predominate both on the nose and palate. Strength wise, you’ll find them in the range between 5% VOL and 7% VOL.

Porter

Dark malts predominate in this style too, so expect similarities in color and aromas with Stouts. Although similar, they have very different backgrounds, as Porters were invented in England centuries ago to quench the thirst of port workers who needed an energy boost.

Today, technically, the only difference between Porters and Stouts is the type of barley used. Stouts are made from unmalted grains, while Porters are based on malted barley, a small, but significant difference. For beer drinkers, the preference usually goes to one or the other.

IPA Brewing Supplies

Home Brewing Supplies

Wild & Sour Ales

These are the trendiest beers around, although it’s one of the older beer styles in existence! Producers don’t ferment these beers with selected, store-bought yeast, but with wild, ambient yeast found naturally in their cellars, and the results are always unpredictable and exciting!

The spontaneous fermentation adds to the beer a set of funky but pleasant flavors and a most welcomed acidity that makes this beer perfect for food pairings.

Amongst this category, you could consider the Belgian Gose, a cloudy, fruity, and tart beer to which producers add a pinch of salt and coriander seeds to make an epic, historical beer.

Pilsner

Along with the pale ale, this is the beer style you should get if you’re getting started in the realm of craft beer.

Pilsner beers where the first clear, bottom-fermenting (lager) beer is the world, developed in the Czech Republic in 1842. The golden-hued, bright, refreshing beer contrasted greatly with the dark, murky beers of the time and soon became the world’s standard.

Fresh, easy to sip, with subtle malt aromas and a light but creamy palate, Pilsners are ideal for summer days.

Brewing at the Philly Beer School!

Brewing at the Philly Beer School!

Wheat Beer

To round up the list, we have the famous wheat beer. This style is accomplished by using wheat instead of, or in addition to barley malt. Wheat beers are rich, creamy, full-bodied ales that are both satisfying and addictive.

Originally from Germany and Belgium, today craft brewers around the globe make pristine examples. A characteristic banana note is common and adding citrus peels to the mixture is also a standard practice — this one you’ll love. Filtered or milky-white, wheat beers are not only popular today, they have been beloved for centuries.

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Economic Assistance Guide for the Wine Trade during the COVID-19 Pandemic https://www.vinology.com/winery-assistance/ https://www.vinology.com/winery-assistance/#respond Thu, 26 Mar 2020 22:12:26 +0000 https://www.vinology.com/?p=625946   HR 748/the “CARES” Act is the two trillion dollar stimulus bill that is now law. It has several key features that any business owner in the wine trade should […]

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Winery Assistance

HR 748/the “CARES” Act is the two trillion dollar stimulus bill that is now law. It has several key features that any business owner in the wine trade should be aware of. Most of the key points are in a subsection called “Keeping American Workers Paid and Employed Act” which was authored by a team of four bipartisan Senators: Marco Rubia (R), Ben Cardin (D), Susan Collins (R) and Jeanne Shaheen (D).

This program is supposed to be fully online by Friday, April 3rd.

While other parts of the stimulus package focused on getting money to US citizens, the KAWPEA is written to protect small businesses. There are a lot of options for someone running a business with less than 50 people, which is pretty much the entire wine trade. In this article, I am listing all the important elements of the bill, and explaining how they could help your business. I will keep this page updated as this bill becomes laws. I hope to have links to applications and information as soon as they become available. Feel free to add relevant information in the comments below.

FYI, this information is valid for any small business, including wine shops and restaurants.

Paycheck Protection Program

Payrolls aren’t as big for wineries as they are for other small businesses, but it’s far from trivial. This program offers loans of 2.5 times your average monthly payroll. The loans have low-interest rates, with a maximum of 4%, and are expected to have a 24-hour turn-around once the program has been established.  The key detail here is that the loan will be forgiven if you maintain the same payroll levels. In effect, this loan would become a grant. You would only have to pay back the interest accrued.

Small businesses are going to benefit greatly from this section. Businesses will be eligible to obtain a loan equal to two and a half times their average monthly payroll for a full year. The program includes a debt forgiveness component (up to 100%) when loan proceeds are used for payroll and other eligible expenses during the eight weeks after obtaining the loan. Those expenses include payroll, rent, mortgage interest, or utilities

Debt is the biggest burden for many in the wine trade. Land and equipment costs often mean you have a multi-million-dollar debt. This section is going to be a Godsend to many small wineries.  This is link to the SBA program page: https://www.sba.gov/funding-programs/loans/paycheck-protection-program

Small Business Debt Relief

Many wineries (as well as breweries and distilleries) have loans from the Small Business Administration (SBA).  Often these SBA loans were taken out to purchase buildings or equipment. This includes the following SBA programs: 504 loans, 7(a) Community Advantage, and Microloan. This bill requires the SBA to forgive your loan for half a year. This means the SBA will pay the principal, the interest, and all fees for half a year. This section has been funded with $17 Billion dollars.

504 Loans

For existing borrowers with SBA 504 loans, SBA has issued guidelines on loan deferments.  If your winery has one of these loans, you should contact your banker.  These payments are supposed to be automatic.

7(a) Loans

The SBA will also pay the principal and interest of new 7(a) loans issued prior to September 27, 2020 for six months.  Applications can be made via a SBA-qualified bank.

Emergency EIDL Grants

This expands the existing Emergency EIDL Grant program that the SBA already runs. This allows for a $10,000 advanced within three days to cover payroll and to service debt obligations. This section has been funded with $17 Billion dollars. This is the link directly to the COVID-19 page: https://disasterloan.sba.gov/apply-for-disaster-loan/index.html  This is a great program if you need money quickly. However, the next section may be a better fit if you can hold out a little longer.

How the Wine School is Helping

If you are a member of the food or wine trade and lost your job, you can become a Wine School Ambassador. We are paying up to 45% of our revenue to people in need. Here is the link to apply: https://www.vinology.com/wine-ambassador-application/

How Much Assistance Could A Winery Recieve?

These are back-of-an-envelope calculations, so YMMV. On average, a medium-sized winery has a payroll burden of $32K and has a debt burden of around $50K. Those are monthly amounts, not annual. That would put the Federal assistance in the ballpark of $380,000 for a medium-sized winery.

SBA Background

The Wine School worked with the SBA to expand it’s footprint several years ago. It was one of the smartest choices I made as a business owner.  In fact,  it went so well that a few of our bankers are now students at the school!  They wrote us up a few years ago: https://www.sba.gov/node/1623864

Wine Industry Lobbyists

In addition to CARES, the lobbyist groups WineAmerica and the Wine Institute have been pushing for several other remediations on Capitol Hill. This includes suspending federal excise taxes through December 31st, making the Craft Beverage Modernization and Tax Reform Act permanent, and suspending tariffs on alcohol beverages and related suppliers. Let’s hope they can push the ball forward on these topics.

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The Story of Champagne https://www.vinology.com/the-story-of-champagne/ https://www.vinology.com/the-story-of-champagne/#respond Mon, 16 Mar 2020 14:05:35 +0000 https://www.vinology.com/?p=606570 Champagne is one of those wines that every person, in every part of the world has heard about. It is the French sparkling wine that has the world in awe. […]

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champagne

A brief overview of Champagne!

Champagne is one of those wines that every person, in every part of the world has heard about. It is the French sparkling wine that has the world in awe. Isn’t it funny though, that this sparkling wine was technically founded by the British and not by the French?

A Brief History of Champers

The first vines of Champagne were initially planted by the Romans in 57BC. For a long time, wines from the region were seen as lesser quality than the rest of France. The quality, however, got progressively better over the following century as Champagne was constantly trying to upstage Burgundy and surpass their quality. This rivalry between the regions intensified to a point where civil war seemed inevitable.
The great feud, however, finally came to an end with the discovery of sparkling wine and the region’s dedication to producing this new, innovative style of wine.

Popular to contrary belief, the discovery of sparkling wines was not intentional.  Sparkling wine was created after a shipment of wine from Champagne reached England and it had refermented inside the barrel. Since the Carbon Dioxide had nowhere to go, it was trapped inside and thus, sparkling wine was born.

Although there were very mixed feelings at first about this sparkling wine, the consumers who enjoyed the bubbles bought copious amounts of the wine and thus, pushing Champagne into producing more of this style.
With time and a lot of refinement over the years, wine producers were able to better quality wine and packaging solutions for these complex wines.

champagne tasting

A Champagne Wine Tasting Class

All Champagne is Bubbly (But Not All Bubbles Are)

The first thing to note about authentic Champagne wine is that it has to come from the region of Champagne in France. The rules regarding the production of Champagne are extremely strict and specific – but it’s what you expect from one of the world’s most prestigious wine producers.

Many places in the world, and even regions in France, create sparkling wines in exactly the same way. Those wine’s can’t be called Champagne.

During production, only the traditional sparkling method is allowed to be used. This method is considered the best method for high-quality wines. The method means that the second fermentation of the wine occurs inside the bottle, trapping all the natural Carbon dioxide bubbles in the wine. Most people (including many sommeliers)  think Chardonnay, Pinot Noir, and Pinot Meunier are the only grapes allowed. That is incorrect. The obscure varietals Arbane, Petit Meslier are allowed, as are Pinot Blanc and Pinot Gris.

This production method is also extremely labor-intensive as each bottle of wine has to go through a process of riddling, disgorgement and topping up. These processes including turning each bottle upside down over a period of days or weeks to allow the dead yeast cells to settle in the neck of the bottle. Thereafter, the bottle-neck is frozen and these yeast cells are shot out, and the wine is topped up with more wine and a bit of sugar.

Champagne and Cheese Pairing

A Champagne and Cheese Pairing

Different styles of champagne

Champagne comes in a few different styles that allow some diversity.

  • Blanc de Blanc (white from white) refers to white grapes used for this white wine. In this case, it can only be Chardonnay.
  • Blanc de Noir (black from white) means that they have used red grapes to produce these whites. In Champagne, this can be either Pinot Noir or Pinot Meunier but is often a blend of the two. It’s important to note that only the skin of a grape is red – so white wines can be produced just by preventing the juice to come into contact with the skins.
  • Rosés are the product of blending these whites and reds together before the wine is bottled.

The accidental production of Champagne was probably one of the greatest things to could happen to the world’s wine industry. With great complexity and uniqueness, Champagne will forever be the drink of celebration. If you want more, check out our wine tasting class on the subject: https://www.vinology.com/class/champagne/

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]]> https://www.vinology.com/the-story-of-champagne/feed/ 0 Wine School and COVID-19 https://www.vinology.com/wine-school-and-covid-19/ Thu, 12 Mar 2020 14:30:18 +0000 https://www.vinology.com/?p=617170 The post Wine School and COVID-19 appeared first on Wine School of Philadelphia.

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Reschedule Codes and Options

Section updated 4/9/2020

As the pandemic continues, we are canceling classes and issuing reschedule codes with at least a week’s notice. This will continue until we are notified that schools can reopen. Please be patient: it may take several weeks to receive a reschedule code due to the backlog of customer support. 

This is specifically for one-day classes. We have offered all Core program students options to reschedule. We are now working on options for the two Advanced courses  that were interrupted by this pandemic.

 

Spport the Wine School!

Section added 3/25/2020

If you are looking to help out in this difficult time, here’s where to find information. We also have included a way for our out-of-work students to earn some additional income. https://www.vinology.com/support-the-wine-school-during-the-covid-19-pandemic/

Philadelphia and ALL Schools have Closed (this includes us)

Section added 3/16/2020

Philadelphia ordered all nonessential businesses to shut down by 5 p.m. on Monday (3/16) and will halt all nonessential government operations on Tuesday, in the city’s most aggressive steps yet to slow the spread of the coronavirus.

Restaurants will have to be take-out only. Most retail stores will shutter through at least March 27. City government offices will be closed to the public, and only essential government employees will report to work. Only businesses classified as “essential” by the city, like supermarkets, gas stations, banks, post offices, daycares, and veterinary clinics will be allowed to remain open, officials said.

Cancelled Classes Information

Section added 3/17/2020

If you are attending a single-session class in March, your class has been cancelled. The purchaser of the tickets was sent an email with all details. This is the blueprint of the email  that was sent:

John Doe,

I hope you are safe and staying healthy. It’s with a heavy heart that we can’t host classes right now. We will reopen as soon as the Governor allows us to, and the pandemic is over.

You have tickets to [name of class] on [date] which has to be postponed. You will be receiving a gift code for the full amount of your purchase. If you purchased these seats for someone else, please let them know the class has been canceled.

We ask only one favor of you: If you have any questions, please wait until after the pandemic is over. By that point, we should have some breathing room.

Postponed Courses Information

Section added 3/16/2020

If you are attending a multi-day course at the school, you were emailed the following:

I hope you are remaining safe and healthy. Its a difficult time for everyone.

Classes will resume once the Governor has given us permission to do so and the pandemic has ended.

Please be assured that, we are doing our best to accommodate you and all your students. We want to make sure that your experience at the Wine School is a fruitful one. We are currently building out contingency plans and will relay them to you as soon as possible. This is not an overnight process and will take weeks.

We ask only one favor of you: If you have any questions, please wait until after the pandemic is over. By that point, we should have some breathing room to answer questions.

 

 

Disinfection Protocols

Our classroom and facilities are disinfected daily using hospital-grade products and have hand sanitizer stations at the entrance. We also have four HEPA air filtration systems scrubbing the air during class.

The classroom is specifically designed in a way to ensure face-to-face distancing. The classroom size is fewer than 25.

These are standard protocols we have in place every winter. We’ve always been very cognizant of these issues and had these protocols in place long before the covid-19 pandemic. We do this every year to prevent any flu virus to !*#&#  with our classes (and your health).

If You (or anyone you know) Have Been Exposed to COVID-19

We take the well being of all our students very seriously. We currently have zero known students who have the virus and attended classes. We track everyone who has attended classes at the school. If you or anyone you know has been exposed to the COVID-19 virus and have attended classes at the Wine School, it is your ethical duty to report this information to us. Please do so on this form.

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Hand Sanitizer Station at Entrance

Hand Sanitizer Station at Entrance

Hospital Grade Disinfectant Used on All Surfaces on a Daily Basis

Hospital Grade Disinfectant Used on All Surfaces on a Daily Basis

70% Alcohol Wipes in Bathroom

70% Alcohol Wipes in Bathroom. Used for Removing Perfume AND for sanitization.

70% Alcohol Wipes in Bathroom. Used for Removing Perfume AND for sanitization.

70% Alcohol Wipes in Bathroom. Used for Removing Cologne AND for sanitization.

Purell Sanitizer Outside Bathrooms

Purell Sanitizer Outside Bathrooms

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]]> March 2020 Newsletter https://www.vinology.com/march-2020-newsletter/ https://www.vinology.com/march-2020-newsletter/#respond Wed, 04 Mar 2020 21:43:10 +0000 https://www.vinology.com/?p=616323 ‌ March 2020 Newsletter ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ FLASH SALE!!! 50% Off  ALL Spring Classes! ‌ Our Spring semester has been sold out for months. Wanna guess what we […]

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The Wine School Newsletter

Register today for our monthly newsletter. Wine reviews, features, and upcoming classes.  Subscribers recieve our wine reviews, sales, and articles weeks before everyone else. 

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]]> https://www.vinology.com/march-2020-newsletter/feed/ 0 February Wine Newsletter https://www.vinology.com/february-wine-newsletter/ https://www.vinology.com/february-wine-newsletter/#respond Mon, 24 Feb 2020 22:15:41 +0000 https://www.vinology.com/?p=615231 ‌ Wine School Newsletter for February ‌ ‌ Wine School Newsletter for February Talk about 1st world problems: with the potential tariffs looming, we pulled in a crazy amount of […]

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Holiday Wine Guide https://www.vinology.com/holiday-wine-guide-2019/ https://www.vinology.com/holiday-wine-guide-2019/#respond Mon, 16 Dec 2019 02:30:56 +0000 https://www.vinology.com/?p=601633 ‌ Happy Holidays! We have a jam-packed newsletter for you this December. It’s everything you need to survive the holidays. The only thing better would be a barrel of whiskey […]

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Winemaker  101

Winemaking Process: How Grapes Are Converted Into Fine-Tasting Wine

Dark-colored (black) grapes are used to create red wine, which can have range in color from intense violent (young wine) to brick red (mature wine) to brown (older wine). The color is all dependent on what level of wine it falls into.

The majority of black grapes will produce a greenish-white color. The grape skin brings about the red color due to its anthocyan pigmentations. There are exceptions, however. For example, the uncommon teinturier variations can generate a red-colored juice. A good chunk of the production technique for red wine entails extrapolating the grape skin’s flavor and color.

How Are Grapes Changed Into Wine Once They Get To The Winery

When grapes arrive to the winery, they’re often an assortment of individual berries, bunches, leaves and stems. When stems are present in the fermentation process, it can cause the wine to taste bitter. De-stemming ensures the grapes are separated from the leaves and stems.

After the grapes have been de-stemmed, they are typically crushed lightly. This usually involves a pair of rollers with a space between them so the winemaker can choose between no crushing, light crushing and hard crushing.

The combination of the grapes, juice, skins and seeds is referred as a must, which is then pumped into a concrete or stainless steel vessel or an oak vat s that it gets fermented.

Once the must is placed into the vessel, the yeast found on grape skins or in the environment will begin the alcoholic fermentation process. The must sugars are changed into alcohol with the by-products being:

  • Heat
  • Carbon dioxide

Some winemakers would rather control this process by including certain types of yeasts from the Saccharomyces cerevisiae species.

Not long after the must is put into the vessel, the division of both the liquid and solid phases begins. The grape skins will create a cap after floating to the top. To get the most flavor and color extraction, it’s vitally important to boost the contact that occurs between the liquid phase and the skins. This can be attained by doing four things:

  • Punching the cap down
  • Immersing the cap
  • Pushing over
  • Drain and return

The fermentation process generates heat, and when it’s not controlled, the fermenting temperature can exceed 104 degrees Fahrenheit. This heat can hinder the flavor and destroy the yeast. Therefore, refrigeration systems help with temperature control. Now, winemakers have their own opinion on what the best temperature is in regards to fermentation:

  • Fruitier red wines are often developed from temperatures that range from 77 to 82.4 degrees Fahrenheit.
  • Tannic wines that are more for the long-aging process is often better in high temperatures of 82.4 to 95 degrees Fahrenheit.

A Second Fermentation Process To Help In The Wine Process

After the alcoholic fermentation takes place for the red wines, a second microbiological change happens – it’s known as malolactic fermentation. This is when malic acid, naturally found in grape juice, is changed into lactic acid due to the bacteria influence. The process is typically done for red wines, taking place naturally due to the existence of lactic acid bacteria wineries often have.

Once this process is done, the red wine is typically removed from the remaining parts and the preservative sulphur dioxide is added to keep bacterial spoilage and oxidation from happening.

The majority of red wine will be aged before it’s bottled – taking place from as little as several days to more than 18 months. The aging process can occur in small or big oak barrels, concrete tanks or stainless steel tanks. Bear in mind that the oak barrels will impact the wine flavor

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